SHARE


こちらは、現在ルーミーにインターンとして参加しているEeviによる記事です。英語と日本語でお届けします。

今週から週2ぐらいのペースで連載「フィンランド出身のわたしから見た日本」を始めたいと思います! 記念すべき第1回目は、日本の「着物」ついて。

This is my first diary entry in “Japan with the eyes of Finnish girl Photo Diary“, which I will keep, and it will be published couple times in week.

In my first diary entry I would like to write about kimonos.



私の出身であるフィンランドでは、日本の着物のような伝統衣装はありますが、年配の世代が、独立記念日や結婚式、フォークダンスパーティなどで着るぐらい。

若者が着る機会はほとんどなく、最近では年配の人たちですら滅多に着ることがありません。

In Finland, we don’t have so much tradition with traditional clothes like Japan have.
We do have traditional Folk costumes, but we only use them in very special occasions (Independence Day parties, wedding, folk dance parties) and they are getting rare more and more. Most of them are worn by older people and it’s very rare to even make them in these days.



そんな背景があるので、着ようと思えば毎日着ることができる着物が今もなお愛され、伝統として強く根付いている日本の文化が私は大好きです。

この記事を執筆するにあたって、明治神宮に写真を撮りに行ったのですが、その際に着物を来た子どもたちをたくさん見かけました。どうやら七五三のお祝いがおこなわれていたみたいで、普段見ることができない光景を見ることができました。

日本の素敵な文化を再発見してもらえると嬉しいです。

When I was on my trip to Meiji Shrine to take some photos of kimonos, I met many children who were celebrating their Shichi-Go-San day, and got a chance to take photos of their beautiful and cute kimonos.

Translated by Nagaomi Kawaharada

この記事を気にいったらいいね!しよう

ROOMIE(ルーミー)の最新情報をお届けします。

あわせて読みたい

powered by cxense